Most people with MS continue to drive as normal.

May 5, 2018

 

 

One of the first questions many people have when they’re diagnosed with MS is: “Will I still be able to drive?” The good news is that most people with MS continue to drive as normal.

 

If you have a driving licence, you have to tell the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) that you have been diagnosed with MS.They will assess your fitness to drive using the information you provide, and they may ask you to have a medical examination or a driving assessment.

You may be:

  • allowed to keep your licence

  • given a temporary licence, valid for one, two or three years

  • given a licence that specifies which adaptations you need to use, or

  • in extreme cases told to stop driving

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

Sativex and driving

 

In England and Wales the law says that anyone found with certain drugs in their body while driving can be prosecuted, whether their driving is impaired or not.

The roadside tests the police use to check for drugs can detect very small amounts of the drug in your system. Unfortunately, this means that if you take Sativex, you may test positive for cannabis.

However, if you are taking Sativex as prescribed by your health professional, you can claim a ‘medical defence’, as long as your driving is not impaired.

The government recommend that if you are taking Sativex, that you have evidence, such as a letter from the DVLA, prescription receipt or a letter from your MS specialist, in your car to avoid any problems if stopped. If you don’t have the evidence on you, you may have to present it at a later date.

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